I’m leaving Pew Research

Believe it or not, 14 years ago, the idea of using the internet for health was a novel concept. That’s when Pew Internet published its first report about the social impact of the internet on health and health care, raising eyebrows across the U.S. Our data was cited in mainstream news outlets, in JAMA, and, most important to me, drew the attention of Tom Ferguson, MD, an online health pioneer who became my guide to the world of e-patients.

I will always be grateful for the incredible latitude I was given to explore and experiment at Pew Internet, thanks to Lee Rainie and our sponsors, the Pew Charitable Trusts and the California HealthCare Foundation. We fielded six national surveys devoted to health and five major fieldwork projects in online patient communities. We were explorers in uncharted territory – areas that would become the most important real estate in the industry – and we were breaking glass on a daily basis, always trying new things. It has been my honor to translate that research into storytelling that benefits decision-makers of all kinds.

For me the new truth is that the most exciting development of the connected health era is not access to information, but access to each other.  The implications are enormous for us all: consumers, clinicians, policy makers, and business leaders. The power of community in health can revolutionize the way care is experienced and delivered. It is our job as an industry to bring that to life, to legitimize and formalize the very real and quantifiable role that community plays in our health. I am called to pursue that mission. So I’m writing a book to drive the idea forward (more on that in another post) and leaving the Pew Research Center to commit to this idea full-time.

In September I’ll also start as an Entrepreneur in Residence (EIR) at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the largest philanthropy in the U.S. devoted to the public’s health. Led by Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, RWJF’s focus on building a culture of health overlaps with my vision; RWJF is uniquely positioned to execute on this audacious goal.

By taking on the EIR role, I’m following in the footsteps of Thomas Goetz, who inaugurated the position and wowed us all with initiatives like Flip the Clinic and Visualizing Health. I can’t wait to get started, taking this definition of entrepreneurship to heart: “the pursuit of opportunity without regard to resources currently controlled.”

The power of community must be unleashed on health if we are to achieve the vision we all hold so dear – a world where empowered individuals and families make informed choices that result in living as well as they can for as long as they can. The wisdom people have about themselves and their loved ones is as vital to their health as the insight they gain from clinicians. Simply put, my goal is to help people understand how powerful they are.

Public service researcher

Vintage nurse recruitment poster: For your country's sake today. For your own sake tomorrow.I think of myself as a public service researcher. The Pew Charitable Trusts and the California HealthCare Foundation provide the funds for the work I do and, in turn, I do everything I can to inject the findings into the public conversation: publish reports and data sets online, for free; talk to reporters and bloggers about the findings; answer questions from interested members of the public; give briefings to policymakers, etc.

As I’ve increased my “surface area” (ie, public availability) I have heard from more and more people who want my advice about their idea for a public health intervention, new website design, health app, business plan, or venture capital strategy (and that’s just this week). But I can’t get my work done if I don’t draw a hard line. So, most of the time, I turn down those requests for private consultations.

However, there are two ways that I can serve those individuals and serve the public: answering their questions in the open, on Twitter and in blog posts. Continue reading