Parkinson’s For One Day

My new job is wonderfully immersive. I leave home early, come back late, and, in between, spend hours talking with people about the future of health, health care, and technology (broadly defined). The HHS IDEA Lab blog will be my outlet for sharing ideas related to the work I do there. This site will serve, as it always has, as a sandbox and outboard memory — the beginnings and middles of ideas, not always the polished ends.

For example:

One week ago I participated in an empathy exercise organized by Smart Patients: Parkinson’s For One Day.

My partner was Gretchen Church, co-founder of Movers & Shakers, a national Parkinson Disease support and advocacy organization. She and I talked for about an hour on Friday night and she started sharing pictures on Twitter, like this shot of her medications:

Pill bottles

I wore a 10-lb. weight around my right ankle and, at Gretchen’s suggestion, a high heel shoe on my right foot and a sneaker on my left. In this way I had to be aware of my gait and balance. Plus she assigned my two sons a job: to say “Freeze” randomly throughout the day. I would have to stop in my tracks for at least 30 seconds. This would mimic the challenge that people with Parkinson’s have, particularly when crossing the street. Continue reading

Hack needed: Tiny pills, trembling hands

Top of a pill bottle reads "Close Tightly" Image by Are W on flickr

A friend writes:

I am sweeping the kitchen and just found one of my brother-in-law’s Parkinson’s pills [Ropinirole].

Every time he has to take it, he drops it. It is tiny and, well, he has Parkinson’s. I can’t tell you how many times the kids end up on the floor looking for the pill he just dropped.

Are there any hacks for a Parkinson’s patient to manage those tiny pills?

For those who aren’t familiar with the term “hack,” its original meaning is “an appropriate application of ingenuity.” I’ve written about home health hacks here and here and I’m actively seeking ways to connect health hackers/makers/inventors with the people who need them. I was thrilled when my friend texted me with this question and I’d love to help.

One idea I had: put a dab of honey on your finger and use that to pick up the pill.

Another idea: ask gardeners how they manage the sorting and handling of tiny seeds.

If you’ve got an idea, please share it in the comments below!

(Image courtesy of Are W on flickr.)