Invent Health

As winter sets in here in DC, I’m warming up with memories of September’s Stanford Medicine X conference. I loved putting together a keynote that highlighted how the maker movement intersects with the e-patient movement — and how private sector and government leaders can benefit. This intersection, and the lessons we are learning from it, are the latest examples of how the internet gives us access not only to information but also to each other. That deceptively simple insight is, I believe, the key to unlocking the potential for innovation in health care.

Here’s an excerpt:

Stanford University posted the full video on their Facebook page and you can learn more about the Invent Health initiative I launched at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services by reading the following posts:

Health care needs a jolt of innovation. Here’s how we’re approaching it at HHS.

Invent Health: The National Week of Making

The Invent Health Initiative: Hardware Innovations for the Low-Resource Environment

Invent Health: Finding Common Ground

The Invent Health Initiative: Hardware Innovations Hard at Work

Invention and Innovation in Emergency Preparedness

Empowering Inventors to Create Tools for Better Living, Better Clinical Care

Kid Inventors Focus on Health

The White House Conference on Aging

Lawn sign in front of the White House announcing the Conference on Aging July 13

The White House Conference on Aging only happens once every ten years — and it’s happening tomorrow.

The program begins at 10 a.m. ET on Monday, July 13, and will be livestreamed: https://www.whitehouse.gov/live

I’ll be on a panel in the late afternoon talking about technology and the future of aging, directly after Tim Brown and Barbara Beskind discuss universal design. (Read this Wall Street Journal article about some of Beskind’s ideas.) Continue reading

The Power of Connection

Portraits of past HHS secretaries above Post-its

Portraits of past HHS secretaries overlooking an IDEA Lab design session

Technology enables the mission of U.S. Department of Health & Human Services (HHS). It widens access to information and tools and pushes power out to all parts of the network, from our colleagues in the federal workforce to our fellow citizens. At HHS, we seek to create a learning system that recognizes the potential of every stakeholder in the network to contribute, from patients and caregivers to clinicians, researchers and policymakers.

The CTO of HHS serves the Secretary and the agency by bringing new approaches to the problems faced by those on the front lines of medicine, public health, and social services.

I see the role as a spotlight and a beacon, highlighting the innovative work being done inside and outside the federal government and inspiring people to reach higher, in service to citizens. Continue reading

Gov 2.0 Expo: Health Geek Guide–Susannah Fox

The cross-disciplinary smorgasbord that is Gov 2.0 Expo will be held this week in DC.  The agenda is packed with nerdy temptations (danah boyd! Anil Dash! Tim Berners-Lee!) but here are my can’t-miss sessions. Continue reading

Tell the FDA the whole story, please–Susannah Fox

I scan menus for keywords (fig, parsnips, salmon…) and it turns out I scan Twitter the same way, looking for anyone who is talking about my favorite topics (data, consumers, information quality…)

So when I saw Jonathan Richman‘s tweet the other night, I couldn’t resist it:

Anyone ever seen data on the overall accuracy of medical information found online? Need help for some final stats for #fdasm

Short answer:

No.

Long answer:

The Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project has been reporting on the social impact of the internet since 2000, when “information quality” on health websites was a big part of the conversation. It was the era of wagging fingers, scolding patients for straying too far outside their boundaries, and Pew Internet data was ammunition.

Continue reading