About Susannah Fox

Susannah Fox is the Entrepreneur in Residence at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Blue sky

Sky MeadowI snapped this at the start of a long walk in Sky Meadows State Park last weekend — a highly recommended trail, even on a hot day, since it winds up a mountainside and through woods that somehow stay cool.

In the spirit of blue-sky, purposeful day-dreaming on a summer Sunday:

I’m reading… “How Do You Do it?” by Raney Aronson.

I’m listening to… Kate Braestrup on The Moth Radio Hour.

I’m watching… Bill T. Jones at TED 2015.

How about you? What are you reading, listening to, watching today?

The White House Conference on Aging

Lawn sign in front of the White House announcing the Conference on Aging July 13

The White House Conference on Aging only happens once every ten years — and it’s happening tomorrow.

The program begins at 10 a.m. ET on Monday, July 13, and will be livestreamed: https://www.whitehouse.gov/live

I’ll be on a panel in the late afternoon talking about technology and the future of aging, directly after Tim Brown and Barbara Beskind discuss universal design. (Read this Wall Street Journal article about some of Beskind’s ideas.) Continue reading

Champions of Change

Secretary Burwell and 9 White House Champions of Change

From left to right: Howard Look, Anish Sebastian, Amy Gleason, Hugo Campos, HHS Secretary Sylvia Burwell, Amanda Haddock, Emily Kramer-Golinkoff, Marcia Boyle, Dorothy Reed, Elizabeth Gross Cohn.

 

Nine Precision Medicine “Champions of Change” were honored at a White House event on Wednesday, July 8. I count everyone in that picture as a community colleague — and some as dear friends.

My role at the event was to moderate a discussion with four of the Champions: Amy Gleason, Anish Sebastian, Hugo Campos, and Howard Look.

In my introduction to the panel, I talked about how this was a panel about data liberation. These four Champions demonstrate how essential it is for individuals to have access to their data, to lift the false boundary between home and clinical care, and to allow patient autonomy to flourish. Continue reading

Flashback to the Future

One year ago this week I was in Sweden to deliver a talk at Almedalen, a festival of ideas held on the island of Gotland.

This year, my community colleague John Nosta brought the latest in American ingenuity to the same event, telling the crowd that digital health is not a far-off promise, but instead simply requires the implementation of technology that exists today. I’ll update this post when The video of his talk is up and you can check out his tweets.

Two essays I wrote about my own trip:

The comments alone are worth a click — fascinating conversations about interoperability of health IT systems, collectivism, equity, and value networks. The conversation is never over, so please post new questions and comments if you see something that inspires you!

The Power of Connection

Portraits of past HHS secretaries above Post-its

Portraits of past HHS secretaries overlooking an IDEA Lab design session

Technology enables the mission of U.S. Department of Health & Human Services (HHS). It widens access to information and tools and pushes power out to all parts of the network, from our colleagues in the federal workforce to our fellow citizens. At HHS, we seek to create a learning system that recognizes the potential of every stakeholder in the network to contribute, from patients and caregivers to clinicians, researchers and policymakers.

The CTO of HHS serves the Secretary and the agency by bringing new approaches to the problems faced by those on the front lines of medicine, public health, and social services.

I see the role as a spotlight and a beacon, highlighting the innovative work being done inside and outside the federal government and inspiring people to reach higher, in service to citizens. Continue reading

Parkinson’s For One Day

My new job is wonderfully immersive. I leave home early, come back late, and, in between, spend hours talking with people about the future of health, health care, and technology (broadly defined). The HHS IDEA Lab blog will be my outlet for sharing ideas related to the work I do there. This site will serve, as it always has, as a sandbox and outboard memory — the beginnings and middles of ideas, not always the polished ends.

For example:

One week ago I participated in an empathy exercise organized by Smart Patients: Parkinson’s For One Day.

My partner was Gretchen Church, co-founder of Movers & Shakers, a national Parkinson Disease support and advocacy organization. She and I talked for about an hour on Friday night and she started sharing pictures on Twitter, like this shot of her medications:

Pill bottles

I wore a 10-lb. weight around my right ankle and, at Gretchen’s suggestion, a high heel shoe on my right foot and a sneaker on my left. In this way I had to be aware of my gait and balance. Plus she assigned my two sons a job: to say “Freeze” randomly throughout the day. I would have to stop in my tracks for at least 30 seconds. This would mimic the challenge that people with Parkinson’s have, particularly when crossing the street. Continue reading

Troublemaker vs. Rebel

List of attributes: troublemaker vs rebel by Lois KellyI adore this slide that Wendy Sue Swanson, MD, captured during a presentation by Helen Bevan. The list was formulated by Lois Kelly and I highly recommend exploring her site: Foghound.com.

The word pair that resonates most with me is “alienate vs. attract,” possibly because it reminds me of my grandmother‘s advice: You catch more bees with honey than with vinegar. How about you? What resonates?

Quantified Self Public Health

Quantified Self Public Health is back! 150+ health geeks of many stripes will gather on Thursday, May 14, in San Diego to discuss how access to personal data could benefit individuals and society.

It is an invite-only meeting (sorry!) but filled with voracious documentarians like Joyce Lee (read her Storify from last year) and, well, me (read my round-up post, which also links to others’ blogs). Follow the tweets on the #QSPH hashtag, too.

Observations and conclusions from last year’s QSPH event were captured in an in-depth report (PDF) and in a series of videos. Here is one of my favorites: Ian Eslick’s talk on the role of personal experimentation in the medical and scientific process:

This year it will be my privilege to interview Don Norman, a design pioneer, on stage.

To prepare, I’ve been reading sections of his books, The Design of Everyday Things and Emotional Design, and watching talks like this one:

I was struck by three themes of Norman’s approach:

1) Solve the correct problem.

My reaction: Boy, does health care need to grok this point. I can’t wait to ask him how to recognize when you’ve dug deep enough into the roots — and what tools to use to get there.

2) Pleasant, attractive things work better.

Reminds me of Michael Graves’s tart review of his hospital room: “I can’t die here. It’s too ugly.” And then he went on to make hospital rooms more beautiful and functional.

3) There is no substitute for direct observation of and interaction with the people who will be using the product.

Yes! I couldn’t agree more. Participatory research *must* come to health care.

Read the full quote from Chapter 6 of The Design of Everyday Things, and, as a thought experiment, substitute “natives” for “patients”:

Don

This point reminds me of conversations I’ve had with people who design communications for HIV clinical trials. They need to use “one voice with many inflections” — that is, one set of facts, but tailored to the population they are targeting, such as sex workers in Thailand vs. Peru.

Switching gears…

A key element of the QSPH meeting is that it will be populated by toolmakers and tinkerers. People who make and hack their way to insights about health. So I’m also reading Mark Hatch’s book, The Maker Movement Manifesto.Book cover: The Maker Movement Manifesto

One of my recent obsessions is the health innovation that is happening at home — the hacks, tips, and tricks that regular people invent to make their lives better. Some are simple, like using a baker’s spatula to turn a large person in bed or sticking a pen through a tennis ball so someone with low dexterity can write. Some are more complicated, like the Do-It-Yourself-Pancreas-System or the Auvi-Q epinephrine injector (both created by people living with the conditions being addressed).

How might we harness the energy of all the people who are making a way out of no way, every day, in health care (that is, patients and their loved ones)? How might we empower them with data and resources? How might we learn from them, and them from us?

Please let me know if you have a question for Don Norman. I know our time will go very quickly, but I want to squeeze as much as I can into the conversation!